ACET Idiom of the Week!

This week’s idiom is Blow away the cobwebs!

CobwebsThis expression means to energise yourself usually by getting some fresh air or exercise.

As we all know, if we don’t clean the corners or picture frames or mantelpieces of our houses, cobwebs will form.  This idiom is very appropriate because when we are tired and lack energy we can visualise cobwebs forming around us. So in order to shake these cobwebs away, we need get up and revitalise ourselves.

Examples:

  1. A long brisk walk by the sea might just blow away the cobwebs.
  2. I just can’t wait to go for a run after this English exam to blow away the cobwebs.

I think you can agree that we all need this from time to time! 🙂

ACET Idiom of the Week!

This week’s idiom is Barking up the Wrong Tree.  

So this week we are continuing with our idioms with a dog theme! 🙂

This idiom means to be wrong in your thoughts or actions about something or someone.

The meaning of this idiom comes from many years ago when hunters would go hunting with their dogs.  The dogs would trace the scent of its prey from the wrong tree and would sit there barking up the tree, until the hunter would come to the conclusion that the prey was not there.

You can put this idiom in a sentence like the following:

  1. If you think that I took your shirt, you are barking up the wrong tree because I wasn’t here all day.
  2. Officer: “Were you at the store last week when it was robbed?” John: “No Sir, I think you are barking up the wrong tree, I was out of town”.

Barking up the wrong treeTry and put this Idiom in a sentence this week!  Have a lovely weekend 🙂

ACET Idiom of the Week!

This week’s idiom is Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

The meaning of this idiom is to leave a situation as it is so as not to cause problems.

The history of this idiom can date back to 1374 when Geoffray Chaucer said “It is nought good a sleeping hound wake”. However, the Celtic Druids stated before then that a good trait of a Druid was “not to disturb a sleeping animal”, meaning that a suitable druid can leave an agrument be by agreeing to disagree.

You can imagine what problems you would have if you woke a very sleepy dog.  So when you leave him alone, there are no difficulties.

dog

Examples:

  • After having an agrument with my friend, I wanted to ring her but I decided to let sleeping dogs lie.
  • Tom told Anna that he didn’t like the new rules of the club and that he wanted to give his views on them. However Anna told him to let sleeping dogs lie.

We should try and use this idiom in our own situations as life will be much easier.

ACET Idiom of the Week!

This week’s idiom is Forty Winks  

40 winksThis expression means to take a very short nap, usually during the day.

As you know, it takes less than a second to wink so you can imagine that forty winks is truly a short rest.

You can put this idiom in a sentence like the following:

  1. Sarah finished work early so she took forty winks before she got ready for the party.
  2. At my lunch break today I am going to catch forty winks.

There is nothing better than sleep! – Sleep tight everyone 🙂